Best practices in teaching writing #6

Quote: teach students to use written aids to monitor their own behavior.

The best written aids are the ones writers make for themselves.

 

Having students develop checklists and similar easy to prepare, easy to follow aids for monitoring and improving their own writing behavior works far better than giving them rubrics, charts, matrices, and posters that I, or some other teacher made.

For a student who hasn’t gotten past D-level writing, a rubric that distinguishes between A-level and B-level writing might as well be in Greek for all the meaning it conveys to that student.

The student whose writing is D-level needs something that will help him or her write C-level work.  For a student used to getting Ds, a C is a stretch, but it’s not so far from a D that it feels totally out of reach.

Writers’ own lists of action statements

The best way to get students to systematically work toward the higher grade, is for each student to make his or her own short checklist of items:

  • the student understands how to do
  • can do without assistance
  • will help raise the student’s writing up to the next higher grade level.

The checklist becomes useful only if each student phrases the checklist items in his/her own words as action statements telling what the student does, not what the student hopes the outcome will be.

If you’re teaching writing strategically, some items can be derived from strategies. For example, if you teach students to prepare a writing skeleton™, the D-writing student’s checklist might say:

  • I wrote a working thesis statement.
  • I made a writing skeleton from my working thesis statement.

Other items on the checklist might be pulled from the student’s own Individual Mastery Plan. For example, a student whose work is usually riddled with comma splices, might want to get rid of those comma splices. To accomplish that, the student might set out his action statement:

  • I checked every comma to make sure it wasn’t being used to splice together two separate sentences.

Teachers have to monitor students’ preparation of written aids to make sure students target actions that will prove useful and to make sure their plans aren’t overly ambitious. Beyond that, however, it’s useful to let students manage their own improvement. That’s what they’ll have to do once they leave school.

Individualized learning isn’t the next best thing.

It has always been the best thing.

© 2017 Linda Aragoni

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