Working Thesis Key to Planning Good Arguments

The most difficult part of writing nonfiction for most students is coming up with a good working thesis to control their planning efforts. With Common Core State Standards putting increased emphasis on argument, it’s useful to look at the role a good working thesis plays in planning an argument.

A first year college student wrote she was having problems writing an argument about holistic health care. She shared the thesis she had already written:

While conventional medicine is science based and has proven it’s place in life threatening illnesses and emergency situations, holistic health care is a less invasive way of healing the whole body, using natural therapies that have been used successfully for hundreds of years.

The student said she feared her thesis was too broad. She also said she didn’t know how to incorporate rebuttal and wasn’t entirely sure her paper was an argument. Her analysis wasn’t far from the mark.

If we strip all the extraneous language from the student’s thesis, we’re left with this as a working thesis:

Holistic health care is a less invasive way of healing the body than conventional medicine.

What is the exact opposite to that position? It’s this:

Holistic health care is a more invasive way of healing the body than conventional medicine.

Would anyone seriously argue that such things as nutrition and de-stressing are more invasive than brain surgery, for example?

No way.

That’s the student’s problem: An argument essay for training purposes needs a debatable working thesis, one that people can argue both for or against using facts and logic. A real-life argument need not be so black-and-white, but students need clear-cut propositions to debate in order to learn the process.

The student’s work contains a nugget that has potential for an argument essay that she might already have research to support:

Holistic care should be used by health care providers in all but life threatening and emergency situations.

To see if there are arguments for that thesis, the student could use a writing skeleton™ following this model:

Holistic care should be used by health care providers in all but life threatening and emergency situations because [reason 1].

Holistic care should be used by health care providers in all but life threatening and emergency situations because [reason 2].

Holistic care should be used by health care providers in all but life threatening and emergency situations because [reason 3].

If the writer can make a case for that position, she still needs to explore the opposition’s argument so she knows what she must refute. To explore the opposition, she can use the writing skeleton™ again like this:

Holistic care should not be used by health care providers in all situations that are not life threatening or emergencies because [reason 1].

Holistic care should not be used by health care providers in all situations that are not life threatening or emergencies because [reason 2].

Holistic care should not be used by health care providers in all situations that are not life threatening or emergencies because [reason 3].

The process I outlined here makes the process of planning an argument easy enough that average students can muddle through it. Muddling through may not sound like much, but students who don’t get through the process the first time rarely try it a second time.

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